Advocacy Groups

Worried About Grandpa’s Guns? Here’s What You Can Do

JoNel Aleccia and Melissa Bailey Seniorhelpdesk.com Healthcare Blog by JoNel Aleccia and Melissa Bailey and Kaiser Health News 

Cover photo: Delmar Scroughams and his wife, Vergie “Verg” Scroughams, pray before dinner in May 2018. Delmar developed dementia after a stroke in 2009 and recently started displaying anger. “In 45 years of marriage, we’ve never had a big fight,” says Verg. “That’s not my Delmar.” (Heidi de Marco/KHN)

When a loved one gets dementia, many families get no guidance on what to do about that person’s guns. Here are legal and practical steps to stay safe.

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

As more Americans are diagnosed with dementia, families who have firearms struggle with ways to stay safe.

IN THIS SERIES:

  • Families Confront Dementia and Guns
  • What Families Can Do
  • Share Your Story

READ MORE

What can families do ahead of time?

Talk to your loved one about how to safely transfer ownership of their guns if they should become incapacitated. Consider writing a “gun trust,” a legal document outlining that process.

Doctors are legally allowed to inquire about access to firearms when a person is diagnosed with dementia. But, experts say, they often don’t. If the health provider doesn’t bring it up, families should ask about gun safety along with other concerns, such as driving and use of kitchen appliances and power tools.

What if a person with dementia wants to transfer their guns?

“No one should hesitate to accept a gun from a family member who is choosing to turn the gun over because of dementia,” said Lindsay Nichols, federal policy director at the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence. Forty-eight states explicitly allow a person to transfer a gun to a family member without a background check, she said. In Connecticut and Rhode Island, a lawyer could justify the move based on interpretation of state law, but prosecution is unlikely, she said.

What if family members don’t want to accept guns?

Some law enforcement agencies will temporarily store guns if there’s a potential threat. In some cases, distressed families have dropped off firearms at gun shops or shooting ranges for safekeeping, though that is not ideal, noted Jacquelyn Clark, owner of Bristlecone Shooting, Training and Retail Center in Lakewood, Colo. Dealers may be able to buy or consign the guns.

What if the gun owner doesn’t want to give them up?

By federal law, a person loses the right to buy or own a gun if a judge deems them mentally incompetent to make decisions. Family members usually have to go to probate court for this kind of ruling, where they can be appointed as a guardian and take control of the guns.

What about veterans?

Veterans who have been deemed mentally incompetent to manage their finances also lose their right, under federal law, to buy or own guns. As of March, nearly 109,000 veterans were barred from gun ownership because of their enrollment in the Veterans Affairs fiduciary program.

What if they’re making threats?

In any state, police can take guns away from someone who threatens a specific crime. In the 11 states with “red flag” gun laws, law enforcement can seek a court order to temporarily seize guns from a person who exhibits dangerous behavior. In five of those states — California, Washington, Oregon, Maryland and New Jersey — family or household members can also initiate these gun-seizure requests.

What if families want to keep the guns at home?

Store the guns unloaded in a locked cabinet or safe, with the ammunition stored separately. You can also disable the guns, replace bullets with blanks or replace the guns with decoys, but that raises the risk of them being mistaken for a functioning weapon in an emergency.

Sources: Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence; state legislatures; Texas Alzheimer’s and Memory Disorders program at Texas Health; Bristlecone Shooting, Training and Retail Center

KHN’s coverage of these topics is supported by Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, John A. Hartford Foundation and The SCAN Foundation

JoNel Aleccia: jaleccia@kff.org, @JoNel_Aleccia

Melissa Bailey: mbailey@kff.org, @mmbaily

Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit health newsroom whose stories appear in news outlets nationwide, is an editorially independent part of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

To contact our columnists with a question or comment use following link: http://khn.org/columnists/For more KHN coverage of aging, and for more information on Kaiser Health News, please visit our web page at: http://khn.org This story can be republished for free.  Details link: http://khn.org/syndication/

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Miami
States: 
Florida

Suze Orman on why creating an online my Social Security Account is Important: Suze Orman explains how a my Social Security account can help you plan for your retirement and why you should create a my Social Security account.

My Social Security is an online portal offered by the Social Security Administration that provides easy access to your Social Security information. The following link will connect you to My Social Security:  https://www.ssa.gov/myaccount/

 if you receive benefits or have Medicare, you can use your my Social Security online account to:

  • Get your benefit verification letter;
  • Check your benefit and payment information and your earnings record;
  • Change your address and phone number;
  • Start or change direct deposit of your benefit payment; 
  • Get a replacement Medicare card; and
  • Get a replacement SSA-1099 or SSA-1042S for tax season. 

If you do not receive benefits, you can:

  • Get your Social Security Statement, to review:
    • Estimates of your future retirement, disability, and survivors benefits;
    • Your earnings once a year to verify the amounts we posted are correct; and 
    • The estimated Social Security and Medicare taxes you’ve paid.
  • Get a benefit verification letter stating that:
    • You never received Social Security benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Medicare; or
    • You received benefits in the past, but do not currently receive them (The letter will include the date your benefits stopped and how much you received that year.); or
    • You applied for benefits but haven’t received an answer yet.
    • Social Security Office Locator - Find Office Locations by Zip Code
      Submitted by Senior Help Desk on Sun, 01/07/2018 - 9:28pm

      For more information about the Social Security Administration visit   www.socialsecurity.gov. You can also use the Link below to find the Social Security Administration, SSA Office near you.The SSA Can help you with questions or issues about your retirement benefits and other federal programs such as SSI. You can also call your local Social Security office to schedule an appointment.

      Link:  https://secure.ssa.gov/ICON/main.jsp

      or Call us at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778), Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

      For more information on Social Security visit:  www.socialsecurity.gov

Categories: 
City: 
Washington DC

Living Apart Together: A New Option for Older Adults

Seniorhelpdesk.com Healthcare Blog by Judith Graham and Kaiser Health News 

This story also ran on Time. This story can be republished for free. Details link: http://khn.org/syndication/

Three years ago, William Mamel climbed a ladder in Margaret Sheroff’s apartment and fixed a malfunctioning ceiling fan. “I love that you did this,” Sheroff exclaimed as he clambered back down.

Spontaneously, Mamel drew Sheroff to him and gave her a kiss.

“I kind of surprised her.  But she was open to it,” he remembered.

Since then, Mamel, 87, and Sheroff, 74, have become a deeply committed couple. “Most nights, I’ll have dinner with Marg and many nights I stay with her overnight,” Mamel explained.

And yet, despite the romance, these North Carolina seniors live in separate houses and don’t plan to move in together or marry. Demographers call this type of relationship “living apart together” (LAT).

“It’s a new, emerging form of family, especially among older adults, that’s on the rise,” said Laura Funk, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Manitoba in Canada who’s written about living apart together.

Questions abound about these unconventional couplings. What effects will they have on older adults’ health and well-being? Will children from previous marriages accept them? What will happen if one partner becomes seriously ill and needs caregiving?

Researchers are beginning to focus on these concerns, said Susan Brown, chair of the sociology department and co-director of the National Center for Family and Marriage Research at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. “It’s really remarkable that older adults are in the vanguard of family change,” she said.

How many older adults are in LAT relationships? According to a 2005 survey by the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, 7 percent of individuals between 57 and 85 years old described themselves as living apart together. (Some experts contend the measure used in this survey was too broad, allowing couples who are dating to be included.)

Last month, at the annual meeting of the Population Association of America in Denver, Huijing Wu, a graduate student in sociology at Bowling Green State University, presented an analysis of nearly 7,700 Wisconsin adults age 50 and older surveyed in 2011. Married couples accounted for 71.5 percent of that group, single people accounted for 20.5 percent, and people who were “partnered but unmarried” accounted for 8 percent.

Of the partnered group, 39 percent were in LAT relationships, according to a more focused definition of this arrangement, compared with 31 percent who were dating (a less committed, shorter-term relationship) and 30 percent who were cohabiting.

Jacquelyn Benson, an assistant professor of human development and family science at the University of Missouri, is among a handful of researchers who’ve asked older adults about their experiences in LAT relationships. “Older adults really see this as a lifestyle choice, not a relationship of convenience,” she said.

Benson’s 2016 study of 25 older adults (from 60 to 88 years old) in LAT relationships found various motivations for these partnerships. Seniors wanted to have “intimate companionship” while maintaining their own homes, social circles, customary activities and finances, she discovered. Those who’d been divorced or in unhappy earlier marriages didn’t want to tie themselves down again and believed a degree of distance was preferable to day-to-day togetherness.

Also, several women who’d cared previously for sick parents or husbands wanted to avoid assuming caregiving responsibilities or the burden of running a household again.

“It’s a been-there-done-that attitude,” Brown explained. “I took care of my husband, I reared my children, and now it’s my time.”

Caregiving is a thorny issue, on multiple fronts. The only known study to look at caregiving in LAT relationships, out of the Netherlands, found that about half of partners planned to provide care, if needed — a sign of ambivalence. But when illness entered the picture, partners offered assistance nonetheless.

“People in LAT relationships forget there’s going to be this emotional entanglement and they won’t just be able to walk away,” Benson said.

Other complications can arise if adult children resent or fail to recognize their older parent’s outside-of-marriage relationship. “In some cases, when a partner wants to step in and have a say, they’ve been pushed out by family members,” Benson noted.

One older woman in her study learned that her partner had been placed in a nursing home by his family only when she couldn’t reach him at home anymore. “They didn’t include her in the conversation at all,” Benson said, “and she was pretty upset about it.”

Only a few studies have evaluated the quality of LAT relationships, which has implications for seniors’ well-being. One found that older adults in these relationships tend to be less happy and receive less support from partners than people who are married. Another, presented at last year’s Population Association of America meeting, found that the quality of LAT relationships isn’t as strong as it is for marriages.

That hasn’t been true for Luci Dannar, 90, who’s been involved with James Pastoret, 94, for almost seven years, after meeting him at a dance at a Columbia, Mo., senior center.

“The first feeling I had for Jim was sorrow because he seemed to be grieving from his wife’s death five months before,” said Dannar, whose husband and oldest daughter both passed away 19 years ago. “I thought maybe I could be helpful to this man because I’d been through those deaths.”

After getting to know Pastoret and realizing she liked him, Dannar laid down her terms. “I told him, I don’t ever want to get married and he said ‘I don’t either,’” she remembered. “And I said if you have a jealous bone in your body, don’t darken my door again. Because I lived 53 years with a jealous husband, and I never want to go through that again.”

Neither wanted to give up their apartments in a retirement community, about 300 steps from each other. “I like my independence,” said Pastoret, who taught in the school of natural resources at the University of Missouri for 33 years. “When I go home at night after supper with Lucy, I’m very happy to be by myself.”

“He comes over at 5 every evening and leaves here about 9, and then I have two hours by myself — my private time,” Dannar said. “We really like our space, our time alone, and we don’t need to be together 24 hours a day.”

Unlike other older LAT couples, they’ve talked about the future and toured assisted living centers together. “Someday, if he needs me to help him or I need him to help me, we will probably rent an apartment together, with our own bedrooms, and hire extra help,” Dannar said. “Our plan is to take care of each other until one of us is gone or we go into a nursing home.”

William Mamel is already making good on a similar promise to Margaret Sheroff, who had a mass removed from her gall bladder late last year and recently was hospitalized with complications from chemotherapy.

“With her in the hospital, I spend most of my days there,” said Mamel, who was a good friend of Sheroff’s with his wife of 37 years, Betty Ann, who passed away 2½ years ago. “Being caregivers for each other isn’t even a question.”

Their situation is complicated by Sheroff’s guardianship for her husband, John, who has advanced dementia and resides in a nursing home. “Marriage isn’t in the picture for us, but that doesn’t matter,” Sheroff said. “We’re taking one day at a time and enjoying being together.”

“Just to be able to have someone that you can wake up with in the morning and talk to, someone to have coffee with and see the smile on their face, is such a blessing,” she continued. “At this time of life, it’s really, really important to have someone in your life who’s there for you.”

KHN’s coverage of these topics is supported by Laura and John Arnold Foundationand Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Author: Judith Graham: @judith_graham

Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit health newsroom whose stories appear in news outlets nationwide, is an editorially independent part of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Author: Judith Graham: @judith_graham

Judith GrahamNAVIGATING AGING by Judith Graham

Navigating Aging focuses on medical issues and advice associated with aging and end-of-life care, helping America’s 45 million seniors and their families navigate the health care system.

To contact Judith Graham with a question or comment use following link:  http://khn.org/columnists/

For more KHN coverage of aging, and for more information on Kaiser Health News, please visit our web page at: http://khn.org

Use Our Content

This KHN story can be republished for free. Details link: http://khn.org/syndication/

 

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Manitoba
States: 
Canada

New Haven Area Senior Network, NHASN May 2018 Meeting on Wednesday May 16, 2018 starting at 8:00 am. Location/Host: Regency House Nursing & Rehabilitation Center 181 East Main Street Wallingford, CT

New Haven Area Senior Networking May 2018 Meeting

Date: Wednesday May 16, 2018

Time: 8:00 AM

Host/Location:

Regency House Nursing & Rehabilitation Center

181 East Main Street Wallingford, CT

Speaker: 

State Representative Craig Fishbein

Legislative updates that effect senior

Please RSVP if attending so we can have an accurate count for seating and food to kimv@cthomecare.com

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Wallingford
States: 
Connecticut
start time: 
Wednesday, May 16, 2018 - 8:00am

High blood pressure is linked to cognitive decline

Senior Help Desk healthcare blog credited to The National Institute on Aging, part of NIH   

 

There’s a saying, “What’s good for your heart is good for your brain.” Evidence supports preventing or controlling cardiovascular conditions such as high blood pressure to protect brain health as adults grow into old age.

One in three American adults has high blood pressure, putting them at risk for heart disease and stroke, conditions that are among the leading U.S. killers. High blood pressure (also called hypertension) can also impact brain health in significant ways. That’s reason enough to check blood pressure regularly and treat it if it’s high, experts say.

How blood pressure affects cognition—the ability to think, remember, and reason—is less well understood. Observational studies show that having high blood pressure in midlife—the 40s to early 60s—increases the risk of cognitive decline later in life. In old age, the impact of hypertension is not so clear.  

In these studies, researchers are investigating how long-standing high blood pressure may harm the brain and lead to cognitive problems. In addition, several blood-pressure drugs and lifestyle changes to control cardiovascular risk are being tested to see if they can maintain or improve cognition in older adults.

“The possibility that controlling hypertension might help delay or prevent cognitive impairment is something we are looking at closely, as hypertension is easily treatable with lifestyle changes and medication,” said Lenore J. Launer, Ph.D., chief of the Neuroepidemiology Section in NIA’s Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences. 

The brain, a vascular organ

At first glance, the connection between blood pressure and the brain makes perfect sense. While only about 2 percent of body weight, the brain receives 20 percent of the body’s blood supply. Its vast network of blood vessels carries oxygen, glucose, and other nutrients to brain cells, providing the energy the brain needs to function properly.

The blood flow that keeps the brain healthy can, if reduced or blocked, harm this essential organ. Uncontrolled high blood pressure plays a part in this damage. Over time, the force of blood pushing against arteries may cause blood vessels to become scarred, narrowed, and diseased. This damage can hamper blood flow to many parts of the body, including the brain. High systolic blood pressure, the top number in blood pressure readings, is considered especially important to monitor as people age.

“The reality is that multiple pathologies in the brain all contribute to cognitive decline,” Dr. Launer said. The types of pathologies high blood pressure leads to include cerebrovascular damage—such as a major stroke, series of small strokes, white and gray matter shrinkage, and microinfarcts (tiny areas of dead brain tissue)—and possibly the plaques and tangles typical of Alzheimer’s disease. Exactly how high blood pressure contributes to vascular brain damage, and how vascular and dementia-related brain processes may interact biologically, is under study.

High blood pressure is common, affecting one-third of American adults and nearly two-thirds of adults age 60 and older. Many people don’t know they have “the silent killer” because it has no symptoms. Only about half of people with high blood pressure, including those who treat it with medication, have it under control.

For more information, read NIA’s High Blood Pressure, and visit the websites of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Instituteand the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Midlife high blood pressure—a risk factor for cognitive decline

After decades of observational research, there’s general agreement that high blood pressure in middle age is a risk factor for later-life cognitive decline, including overall cognition, memory, and processing speed.

Much of the data comes from studies of large groups of adults who were followed for many years. For example, the NIA-supported Honolulu-Asia Aging Studymeasured cognition in 3,734 Japanese-American men in Hawaii, with an average age of 78, who’d had their blood pressure measured more than 20 years earlier. Researchers found that for every 10-mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure, there was a 9 percent increase in risk for poor cognitive function.

Similarly, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities neurocognitive study followed more than 13,000 white and African-American adults, starting at age 48 to 67, for 20 years. In later life, performance on cognitive tests of short-term memory, executive function, and processing speed fell for all participants. Those with high blood pressure (systolic blood pressure of 140 or greater and/or diastolic blood pressure of 90 or greater) or prehypertension (systolic blood pressure of 120 to 139 and/or diastolic blood pressure of 80 to 89) at the start of the study scored worse than those with normal blood pressure. Participants who used drugs to treat their high blood pressure scored better than those with untreated hypertension, but not as well as those with normal blood pressure.

These and other studies are consistent with the conclusion that controlling blood pressure in midlife—years before most people become concerned with age-related cognitive loss—might help maximize the potential for protecting brain function later in life.

What about older adults with high blood pressure? Can they reduce their risk of cognitive decline by controlling newly diagnosed hypertension? Research findings so far have been inconsistent. One NIA-supported epidemiological study suggested that taking blood pressure-lowering medications may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s dementia. Another study found that slightly elevated blood pressure may be important for lowering the risk for cognitive impairment in adults 90 and older.

The challenges of clinical trials

Despite this observational evidence, clinical trials—the gold standard of medical proof—have not shown that controlling high blood pressure through specific drugs or lifestyle changes can prevent cognitive decline or Alzheimer’s dementia.

“Most trials of antihypertensive drugs have not been designed with dementia in mind,” Dr. Launer said, “or the assessment of cognition has been too general or too brief, or the duration of the trial is too short, to be conclusive.”

A clearer answer may come when results of the SPRINT-MIND clinical trial are announced, possibly in 2017, Dr. Launer said: “This trial will provide important clinical information about whether treating blood pressure in people age 50 and older can lower the risk for dementia or cognitive decline.”

The landmark Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT), which included 9,300 participants, ended in 2015 with a positive finding about blood pressure control and heart health: Lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 120, which is below the hypertension threshold of 140, significantly reduced the number of deaths and cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, in nondiabetic adults age 50 and older. Similar results were found for about 2,600 participants age 75 and older.

The Memory and Cognition in Decreased Hypertension (MIND) add-on study is comparing the two blood-pressure targets for their impact on cognitive function and dementia in SPRINT participants. About 640 of them are having brain scans to look for vascular disease and changes in brain structure. The trial is sponsored by the National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, with support from NIA, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, all part of the National Institutes of Health.

Understanding the many connections between the heart and the brain will take time, and questions abound: Are there certain drugs, exercise routines, or diets that benefit or harm cognition? How long should beneficial steps be taken to make a difference? What doses are effective? Would certain people benefit more than others?

The following clinical trials are recruiting middle-aged and older adults to learn more:

  • Intensive Versus Standard Blood Pressure Lowering to Prevent Functional Decline in Older People—testing two blood-pressure drugs in people age 75 and up to compare their effects on cognition and mobility.
  • Candesartran vs. Lisinopril Effects on the Brain (CALIBREX)—seeking adults age 60 and older with high blood pressure and executive mild cognitive impairment for a trial comparing the effect of two blood-pressure drugs on executive function.
  • Early Detection and Prevention of Mild Cognitive Impairment due to Cerebrovascular Disease—recruiting adults age 55 and older with mild cognitive impairment and a vascular risk factor such as hypertension to study the impact of controlling vascular risk factors.
  • Telmisartan to Prevent Alzheimer’s in African Americans—testing an angiotensin receptor blocker for its effect on adults age 45 and older with treated high blood pressure.
  • Carvedilol in Alzheimer’s Disease—looking for adults with Alzheimer’s disease to determine if this beta-blocker improves memory.
  •  

The National Institute on Aging, part of NIH leads the federal government effort conducting and supporting research on aging and the health and well-being of older people. The Institute seeks to understand the nature of aging and the aging process, and diseases and conditions associated with growing older, in order to extend the healthy, active years of life. For more information on research, aging, and health, go to www.nia.nih.gov.

 

 The National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

niaic@nia.nih.gov 
Phone: 1-800-222-2225
TTY: 1-800-222-4225
Phones are answered Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (Eastern time)

National Institute on Aging
Building 31, Room 5C27
31 Center Drive, MSC 2292
Bethesda, MD 20892

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Bethesda
States: 
Maryland

Leafy greens linked with slower age-related cognitive decline

Senior Help Desk healthcare blog credited to The National Institute on Aging, part of NIH   

A recent report in the journal Neurology found that a diet containing approximately one serving of green leafy vegetables per day is associated with slower age-related cognitive decline.

Dr. Martha Clare Morris and colleagues from Rush University in Chicago and the Tufts Human Nutrition Research Center in Boston followed 960 older adults enrolled in the Rush Memory and Aging Project.  The research team focused on the level of consumption of green leafy vegetables, like spinach, kale, collards, and lettuce, which have been suggested in previous research to have protective factors against cognitive decline (Kang et al., 2005; Morris et al., 2006), and looked at the association with performance on cognitive tests.

The average age of the participants was 81 years and all were dementia-free at the beginning of the study. Over an average of nearly 5 years, participants underwent an annual battery of tests that assessed cognition in five domains (episodic memory, working memory, semantic memory, visuospatial ability, and perceptual speed). Data from food frequency questionnaires administered at the beginning of the study were used to assess how frequently people ate some 144 items over the previous 12 months. Dietary intake levels of the nutrients of interest were estimated from responses to all food items. The three green leafy vegetable items and their serving sizes included in the questionnaire were: spinach (1/2 cup cooked), kale/collards/greens (1/2 cup cooked), and lettuce salad (1 cup raw). Additional diet, health, and demographic information was collected during annual visits.

In the study, consumption of green leafy vegetables was positively and significantly associated with slower cognitive decline. When comparing the highest daily consumption (median 1.3 servings a day) with the lowest (median 0.09 servings a day), the rate of cognitive decline among those who consumed the most to those who consumed the least was equivalent to being 11 years younger cognitively, based on average global cognitive scores over time. There was no evidence that the association was affected by cardiovascular conditions, depressive symptoms, low weight, or obesity.

The researchers also examined the relationship between cognitive change and nutrients for which green leafy vegetables are a rich source (folate, phylloquinone, nitrate, α-tocopherol, kaempferol, and lutein). Intake of these nutrients were each individually positively and significantly associated with slower rates of cognitive decline and were not due to other underlying health issues.  Further investigation indicated that phylloquinone, lutein and folate likely were the source of the effect seen on cognitive decline.

This study indicates that consumption of green leafy vegetables is associated with a slower rate of cognitive decline in older adults, possibly due to the neuroprotective actions of specific nutrients. As research continues, the researchers suggest that adding a daily serving of green leafy vegetables to one’s diet may contribute to brain health.

References:

Morris MC, et al. Nutrients and bioactives in green leafy vegetables and cognitive decline. Neurology. 2017 90:e214-e222. Research supported by NIA grants R01 AG031553 and R01 AG17917.

Kang JH, et al. Fruit and vegetable consumption and cognitive decline in aging women. Annals Neurology. 2005 57:713–720.

Morris MC, et al. Associations of vegetable and fruit consumption with age-related cognitive change. Neurology. 2006 67:1370–1376.

 

The National Institute on Aging, part of NIH leads the federal government effort conducting and supporting research on aging and the health and well-being of older people. The Institute seeks to understand the nature of aging and the aging process, and diseases and conditions associated with growing older, in order to extend the healthy, active years of life. For more information on research, aging, and health, go to www.nia.nih.gov.

 

 The National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

niaic@nia.nih.gov 
Phone: 1-800-222-2225
TTY: 1-800-222-4225
Phones are answered Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (Eastern time)

National Institute on Aging
Building 31, Room 5C27
31 Center Drive, MSC 2292
Bethesda, MD 20892

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Bethesda
States: 
Maryland

2018 LeadingAge Connecticut Annual EXPO on May 8, 2018 from 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM. Located at The Aqua Turf Club 556 Mulberry Street Plantsville, CT

2018 LeadingAge Connecticut Annual EXPO - May 8, 2018 from 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM. Location: Aqua Turf Club  556 Mulberry Street  Plantsville, CT 

Please join us for our annual tradeshow and educational event that is specifically designed for management level professionals. With an average attendance of over 300 providers of aging services and senior housing, it's an excellent opportunity for networking.   Attendee information: http://www.leadingagect.org/expo-attendee

LeadingAge Connecticut's  2018 EXPO is one of the largest trade shows in Connecticut for aging services vendors. This year’s EXPO will feature over eighty local and nationall companies with many products and services to showcase. These vendors represent a large variety of services including: accounting, architecture, banking, building services, construction, food service, group purchasing, human resources, health care, insurance, linen, medical supplies, patient handling, pharmacy, rehabilitation on, transportation on and wound care. Pack your business cards and don’t miss this great opportunity to learn about what’s new in our field! 

The LeadingAge Connecticut EXPO is the opportunity to reconnect and network with your peers in the aging services conitnuum. Join the EXPO Grand Sponsors and our Platnum and Gold Partners at a networking breakfast and luncheon and make some new contacts. 

For more information on The LeadingAge Connecticut visit:   www.leadingagect.org

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Plantsville
States: 
Connecticut

April 16, is National Healthcare Decisions Day: Make Your Advance Healthcare Decisions and Let Your Wishes Be Known!

April 16, is National Healthcare Decisions Day: Make Your Advance Healthcare decisions and Let Your Wishes Be Known!

National Healthcare Decisions Day educates and empowers the public and healthcare providers to take part in important advance care planning.

Emphasizing the spotlight on the importance of advance directives, National Healthcare Decisions Day, is a collaborative effort of national, state and community organizations. Together these entities work to ensure that the information, opportunity and access needed to document health care decisions is available to all decision-making capable adult citizens of United States.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Plan ahead for important healthcare decisions. Use #HealthcareDecisionsDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

National Healthcare Decisions Day was founded by Nathan Kottkamp, McGuireWoods LLP.  For complete information regarding National Healthcare Decisions Day, go to:  http://www.nhdd.org/

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Milford
States: 
Connecticut

Shoreline Area Senior Network, SASN April 2018 meeting on Wednesday April 25, 2018 from 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM. Location/Host: Cedar Woods Senior Living 80 Cedar Street Branford, CT 06405

Shoreline Area Senior Network, SASN April 2018 meeting on Wednesday April 25, 2018 from 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM. Location/Host: Cedar Woods Senior Living
80 Cedar Street Branford, CT  06405 

You must RSVP so we can be sure to have enough breakfast items and seating.  Please respond by clicking the RSVP link below by no later than Monday, April 23, 2018.

RSVP Link:  SASN-RSVP@comcast.net

HOST/LOCATION:

  

Cedar Woods Senior Living
80 Cedar Street
Branford, CT  06405 

 203-528-0289

 

SPONSORS: 
 

  

 

 

    

SPEAKER

   Debra A. Hamilton, Esq./Mediator  

  Hamilton Law and Mediation PLLC 

                                                  
TOPIC 

    "MAAPing the Journey Pets Take When No One Can Care For Them"

This program gives a simple outline that can be used by practitioners to assist seniors in planning for the long/short term care of their beloved animal companions. 

 

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Branford
States: 
Connecticut
start time: 
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - 8:00am

2018 LeadingAge Connecticut Annual Expo on May 8, 2018 from 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM. Location: Aqua Turf Club 556 Mulberry Street Plantsville, CT

 

 

2018 LeadingAge Connecticut Annual EXPO on May 8, 2018 from 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM. Location: Aqua Turf Club  556 Mulberry Street  Plantsville, CT 

Please join us for our annual tradeshow and educational event that is specifically designed for management level professionals. With an average attendance of over 300 providers of aging services and senior housing, it's an excellent opportunity for networking.  Attendee information: http://www.leadingagect.org/expo-attendee

LeadingAge Connecticut's  2018 EXPO is one of the largest trade shows in Connecticut for aging services vendors. This year’s EXPO will feature over eighty local and nationall companies with many products and services to showcase. These vendors represent a large variety of services including: accounting, architecture, banking, building services, construction, food service, group purchasing, human resources, health care, insurance, linen, medical supplies, patient handling, pharmacy, rehabilitation on, transportation on and wound care. Pack your business cards and don’t miss this great opportunity to learn about what’s new in our field! 

The LeadingAge Connecticut EXPO is the opportunity to reconnect and network with your peers in the aging services conitnuum. Join the EXPO Grand Sponsors and our Platnum and Gold Partners at a networking breakfast and luncheon and make some new contacts. 

For more information on The LeadingAge Connecticut visit:   www.leadingagect.org

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Plantsville
States: 
Connecticut