Advocacy Groups

Greater Bridgeport Elderly Services Council / GBESC APRIL 2017 MEETING: On Wednesday April 5, 2017 starting at 8:30 am Located/Hosted by: Middlebrook Farms 2750 Reservoir Rd. Trumbull, CT

 

Greater Bridgeport Elderly Services Council / GBESC APRIL 2017 MEETING:

DATE & TIME:  Wednesday April 5, 2017 starting at 8:30 am

Location/Hosted:  Middlebrook Farms 2750 Reservoir Rd.  Trumbull, CT

8:30 am- Networking/Breakfast

9 am - Presentation

SPEAKER / TOPIC:

Dr. Joseph Sacco, Medical Director  Ct Hospice

" What is Palliative Care Really" 

 

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Trumbull
States: 
Connecticut
Zip code: 
06611
County: 
Fairfield
start time: 
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 8:30am

Shoreline Area Senior Network's monthly breakfast meeting on Wednesday March 22, 2017 from 8:00 am to 9:30 am at Aaron Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center Chester, CT. 3 South Wig Hill Road Chester, CT 06412

Shoreline Area Senior Network's monthly breakfast meeting on Wednesday March 22, 2017 from 8:00 am to  9:30 am at  Aaron Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center  Chester, CT.  3 South Wig Hill Road Chester, CT 06412

SPEAKER

Joan Reed Wilson, Attorney
Wilson, Pinder & Snow 

TOPIC

 Powers of Attorney and Advance Directives and Conservatorships, OH MY!

Learn the differences so you can provide proper care to your patients and residents, work with families, and protect yourself.

 

You must RSVP so we can be sure to have enough breakfast items.  Please respond by clicking the RSVP Button below by no later than Monday, March 20, 2017.

 RSVP LINK: SASN-RSVP@comcast.net

 

For more information on Aaron Manor please visit our web site at: http://www.aaron-manor.net/page/17678-Location

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Chester
States: 
Connecticut
Zip code: 
06412
County: 
New haven
start time: 
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 8:00am

Snow Shoveling Safety: Be Aware of Heart Attack Symptoms

 

seniorhelpdesk.com video blog credited to CNYCentral​ and Ross Sullivan, MD

 

Cold Weather Snow Shoveling and Your Risk for Heart Attack

​Article credited to Cardiologist Grace Cater, MD. Doctor Carter  explains the chilling effect of cold weather on the heart. Sudden exertion activities in cold weather can trigger a heart attack or sudden cardiac death.

Some activities such as snow shoveling, walking through heavy wet snow or in a snow drift, downhill and cross country skiing, snow-boarding, can strain the heart enough to cause a heart attack.

Snow shoveling can be more strenuous than exercising full throttle on a treadmill. While this may not be a problem if an individual is healthy and fit, it can be dangerous if not.

Shoveling, even pushing a heavy snow blower, can cause sudden increase in blood pressure and heart rate, and the cold air can cause constriction of the blood vessel and decrease oxygen to the heart. All these work in concert to increase the work of the heart and trigger a potentially fatal heart attack.

Individuals who are at risk of a heart attack during cold outdoor activities include:

  • Those with a prior heart attack
  • Those with known heart disease
  • Those with high blood pressure or high cholesterol
  • Smokers
  • Those who lead a sedentary lifestyle

Such individuals should think twice about shoveling snow and should talk to their doctor before taking on such a task.

Tips for Protecting Your Heart 

Before You Shovel Snow

  • Talk to your doctor before you take on the task of snow shoveling 
  • Avoid shoveling immediately after you awaken as most heart attacks occur early in the morning when blood is more prone to clotting. Wait for at least 30 minutes and warm up
  • Do not eat a heavy meal before shoveling: blood gets diverted form the heart to the stomach
  • Warm up your muscles before starting by walking for a few minutes or marching in place
  • Do not drink coffee or smoke for at least one hour before or one hour after shoveling or during breaks. These are stimulants and elevate your blood pressure and heart rate

While Shoveling Snow

  • Use a small shovel: shovel many small loads instead of fewer heavy ones 
  • Begin slowly and take frequent, 15-minute breaks
  • Drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration
  • Dress in layers, to avoid hypothermia (low body temperature) or overheating
  • Cover your head and neck (50% body heat lost thru head and neck)
  • Cover your mouth (breathing cold air can cause angina or trigger breathing problems)
  • Watch for warning signs of a heart attack, lightheadedness, dizziness, being short of breath, or if you have tightness or burning in chest, neck, arms or back. If you think you are having a heart attack, call 911.
Categories: 
City: 
Milford
States: 
Connecticut

The Connecticut Partnership for Long Term Care is a joint effort by the Connecticut state government and the private insurance industry to help Connecticut residents meet their long term care needs without depleting all of their assets to pay for care.

    
 

Awareness Provided by:

   Longevity Planning Advisors 

& OneSource for Senior Living

Connecticut Partnership for Long-Term Care 

The Connecticut Partnership for Long Term Care is a joint effort by the Connecticut state government and the private insurance industry to help Connecticut residents meet their long term care needs without depleting all of their assets to pay for care. It is administered by the Connecticut Office of Policy and Management.    Make sure you are taking advantage of the programs available to you.

Schedule Your FREE Consultation Today

Call - 203.344.7044, email - info@seniorlife123.org or set an appointment on our website www.seniorlife123.org

For more information visit: http://www.ct.gov/OPM/cwp/view.asp?a=2995&q=383452

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Hartford
States: 
Connecticut
County: 
Hartford

The 9th Annual CAPE Symposium Quinnipiac University (North Haven Campus) Presents: "First Responders: Detecting & Responding to Elder Abuse Workshop" on Thursday, April 20, 2017 from 8:30AM to 3PM* at

The 9th Annual CAPE Symposium Quinnipiac University (North Haven Campus) Presents:  "First Responders: Detecting & Responding to Elder Abuse Workshop" on Thursday, April 20, 2017 from 8:30AM to 3PM*

 

LOCATION: Quinnipiac University (North Haven) l Auditorium MNH 101

First Responders: Detecting & Responding to Elder Abuse

 

The event, with guest speakers, audience discussion and lunch, runs from 8:30AM to 3PM*

*This program is pending approval for Continuing Education Credit Hours by the National Association of Social Workers.

* (LAW ENFORCEMENT) This program is approved for 3 Continuing Education Credit Hours by the State of Connecticut Police Officer Standards & Training Council

* (FIRE FIGHTERS) This program is pending approved for 4 Continuing Education Credit Hours by the State of Connecticut Department of Administrative Services, Office of Education & Data Management. 

* (SOCIAL WORKERSThis program is pending approval for 4 Continuing Education Credit Hours by the National Association of Social Workers.

 

 To register or for more information contact, Erin Burk-Leaver

eburk@jseniors.org or (203) 364-8251 

or

 contact Marianne Arszyla at Jewish Senior Services®

at: (203) 396-1054  or email: MArszyla@jseniors.org

 

What is CAPE?

The Coalition for Abuse Prevention of the Elderly (CAPE) is a collaborative effort of citizens, agencies, organizations, and businesses in Fairfield County concerned about the safety of older adults. CAPE aims to prevent abuse and help victims through advocacy, awareness, professional training and support. Facilitated by staff of the Center for Elder Abuse Prevention of Jewish Senior Services and the Southwestern Connecticut Agency on Aging, CAPE was founded in 2008 with a grant from the National Center for the Prevention of Elder Abuse.

 

Erin Burk 
Community Advocate for the

[http://]
 
          Assisted Living and Memory Care Residences
Long Term Care • Rehabilitation Services • Day Services
       Home Care • Hospice • Advocacy and Education  
        Long Term Care Protection • Home Together
                            Child Development Center
                                       Fitness Center

 

Jewish Senior Services
4200 Park Ave
Bridgeport, CT 06604

203-364-8251
Fax: 203-396-1039
EBurk@jseniors.org
www.jseniors.org
 

 

Do you GoodSearch? (Give to The Jewish Home when you search at www.goodsearch.com)

 

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
North Haven
States: 
Connecticut
Zip code: 
06464
County: 
New Haven
start time: 
Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 8:30am

More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease. Share the facts and join the fight at alz.org/facts.

 

seniorhelpdesk.com video credited to the Alzheimer's Association-Florida Gulf Coast Chapter

Alzheimer’s is not just memory loss – Alzheimer’s kills. 1 in 3 seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another dementia. Share the facts and join the fight to end Alzheimer’s. 

More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease. Share the facts and join the fight at alz.org/facts.

Categories: 
States: 
Florida

Margaritaville Holdings and Minto Communities announced a partnership that will develop new active adult communities

 

Margaritaville Holdings and Minto Communities Announce Partnership

SENIORHELPDESK.COM HEALTHCARE BLOG CREDITED TO AUTHOR: COURTNEY GRIFFITH 

 

latitude-sales-center

latitude-logominto-logo
Margaritaville Holdings and Minto Communities today announced a partnership that will develop new active adult communities in some of the nation’s most popular destinations. The first location of the all-new residential concept will open in Daytona Beach, Florida (see renderings below). The Sales Center at LATITUDE MARGARITAVILLE, Daytona Beach has already broken ground and is slated to open in Fall 2017.

“We are excited to partner with Minto and believe this relationship will redefine lifestyle destination living in Daytona Beach,” said John Cohlan, chief executive officer of Margaritaville. “With Minto’s expertise in creating master planned developments and Margaritaville’s inherent ability to deliver fun and escapism, Latitude Margaritaville has the exact coordinates for those looking to live the Margaritaville lifestyle as they grow older, but not up.”

Featuring world-class amenities and design, LATITUDE MARGARITAVILLE, Daytona Beach will reflect Margaritaville’s authentic, “no worries,” tropical vibe, offering an immersive brand experience. Current plans call for walkable neighborhoods and a Town Center featuring a fitness center with an aerobics studio, indoor lap pool, spa, and group fitness classes; indoor and outdoor dining with signature Margaritaville food and beverage concepts, as well as others; arts and learning programs for residents and guests; and a resort pool area with beach entry. In true Margaritaville fashion, music will also play an important part in the community, with a band shell for live entertainment in the Town Center. A private beachfront club with breathtaking views and beachfront amenities will be set on the Atlantic Ocean, which residents can access via a continuous loop shuttle service.

“For over 60 years Minto has focused on providing incredible lifestyle in the communities we create,” said Bill Bullock, senior vice president of Minto Communities. “We are thrilled to be partnering with Margaritaville to put the exclamation point on fun living for active adults!”

With an ideal location in Daytona Beach at LPGA Blvd. and I-95, the destination offers access to the area’s world-famous beaches; championship golf at LPGA International; Daytona International Speedway; Daytona Beach International Airport; the new Daytona One entertainment, dining and shopping destination; and much more.

Additional details on plans are expected later this year.

For more information please visit www.LatitudeMargaritaville.com. For more information on Margaritaville, visit www.margaritaville.com. Follow Margaritaville on Facebook at www.facebook.com/margaritaville, and on Twitter and Instagram at @Margaritaville. For more information on Minto, visit www.mintofla.com. Follow Minto on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mintoflorida, and on Twitter and Instagram at @MintoFlorida.

latitude-town-center-pool

 

 

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
DAYTONA
States: 
Florida

LeadingAge Connecticut EXPO 2017 on May 24, 2017 at The Aqua Turf Club 556 Mulberry Street Plantsville, CT

  LeadingAge Connecticut  EXPO 2017 on May 24, 2017 at The Aqua Turf Club 

Address: 556 Mulberry St, Plantsville, CT 06479

About Leading Age Connecticut:    http://www.leadingagect.org

 Our premier event!   The "LeadingAge Connecticut  2017 Annual EXPO on  May 24, 2017," is a trade show and educational conference for the long-term care and housing community, appeals to Connecticut’s non-profit and proprietary providers. Hundreds of attendees spend the day at our show, being inspired by informational general sessions and viewing the exhibits of vendors supporting the field of long term care and senior housing. Nursing home administrator CEUs are provided.  

LeadingAge Connecticut is a membership organization representing over 130 not-for-profit provider organizations serving older adults and disabled individuals across the continuum of services, supports and housing, including nursing homes, residential care homes, housing for the elderly, life plan communities, adult day services, home health care agencies and assisted living. 

LeadingAge Connecticut members are sponsored by religious, fraternal, community and governmental organizations that are committed to providing quality care and services to their residents and clients.

LeadingAge is the national partner of LeadingAge Connecticut. LeadingAge is an association of 6,000 not for profit organizations dedicated to expanding the world of possibilities for aging. Together, we advance policies, promote practices and conduct research that supports, enables and empowers people to live fully as they age.

 

 

Interested in Showcasing your Company at the LeadingAge Connecticut EXPO 2017?
 

Be an EXPO Grand Sponsor for $3,000 
LeadingAge Connecticut has redesigned the EXPO sponsorships to create one non-exclusive sponsorship level that not only brings a higher level of exposure to all of the EXPO sponsors but also includes pre-EXPO promotion and participation the day’s activities as well. 
•    Complimentary Booth – 8’X10’ booth with electricity in highly visible sponsorship location at the tradeshow 
•    EXPO Food Sponsorship – Includes multiple signage of your logo sponsoring the Attendee Breakfast, Luncheon and Refreshments at the EXPO. The entire day! 
•    Tradeshow Entertainment – Your logo predominately displayed at the entertainment area 
•    EXPO Notepad – Your logo predominately displayed on the official EXPO note pad 
•    Networking – Ability to attend breakfast and lunch with the attendees 
•    Signage – Recognition as EXPO Grand Sponsor on all marketing materials and at event 
•    EXPO T-Shirt – Logo to be recognized on EXPO T-shirt as EXPO Grand Sponsor 
•    Program Recognition – Full page listing of EXPO Grand Sponsors on inside front cover of the EXPO onsite guide 
•    Complimentary Tickets – Two complimentary registrations to attend the Annual EXPO 
•    Exposure – Organization’s logo with web link on LeadingAge Connecticut website as associated with the EXPO (size is prorated compared to LeadingAge Connecticut Platinum and Gold Partners) 
•    EXPO Attendee List – A copy of a preliminary attendee contact list to be sent one week prior to the EXPO and a finalized attendee contact list will be sent post event

Contact Andrea Bellofiore at abellofiore@leadingagect.org for more information.

   Our premier event! EXPO, a trade show and educational conference for the long-term care and housing community, appeals to Connecticut’s non-profit and proprietary providers. Hundreds of attendees spend the day at our show, being inspired by informational general sessions and viewing the exhibits of vendors supporting the field of long term care and senior housing. Nursing home administrator CEUs are provided. 

Please note: If you are representing a business, you are not permitted to register and attend EXPO as an attendee. All business representatives must either be an exhibitor in the LeadingAge Connecticut Tradeshow or be an EXPO Sponsor to attend.

 

For more information on the LeadingAge Connecticut, please contact us at: 

LeadingAge Connecticut | Contact Us at  (203) 678-4477

Address: 110 Barnes Road, Wallingford, CT 06492

or on our web page at   http://www.leadingagect.org

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Plantsville
States: 
Connecticut
Zip code: 
06460
County: 
New Haven
start time: 
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 8:30am

Geriatricians Can Help Aging Patients Navigate Multiple Ailments

seniorhelpdesk.com healthcare blog credited to  Judith Graham and and Kaiser Health News, please visit our web page at: http://khn.org

For months, Teresa Christensen’s 87-year-old mother, Genevieve, complained of pain from a nasty sore on her right foot. She stopped going to church. She couldn’t sleep at night. Eventually, she stopped walking except when absolutely necessary.

Her primary care doctor prescribed three antibiotics, one after another. None worked.

“Doctor, can’t we do some further tests?” Teresa Christensen remembered asking. “I felt that he was looking through my mother instead of looking at her.”

Referred to a wound clinic, Genevieve was diagnosed with a venous ulcer, resulting from poor circulation in her legs. A few weeks ago, she had a successful procedure to correct the problem and returned home to the house where she’s lived for more than 50 years in Cottage Grove, MN, a suburb of St. Paul.

Would her mother benefit from seeing a geriatrician going forward, wondered Christensen, her mother’s primary caregiver, in an email to me? And, if so, how would she go about finding one?

I reached out to several medical experts, and they agreed that a specialist in geriatrics could help a patient like Genevieve, with a history of breast cancer and heart failure, who’d had open heart surgery at age 84 and whose mobility was now compromised.

Geriatricians are “experts in complexity,” said Dr. Eric Widera, director of the geriatrics medicine fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco.

No one better understands how multiple medical problems interact in older people and affect their quality of life than these specialists on aging. But their role in the health care system remains poorly understood and their expertise underused.

Interviews with geriatricians offer insights useful to older adults and their families:

Basic knowledge. Geriatricians are typically internists or family physicians who have spent an extra year becoming trained in the unique health care needs of older adults.

They’re among the rarest of medical specialties. In 2016, there were 7,293 geriatricians in the U.S. — fewer than two years before, according to the American Geriatrics Society.

Geriatricians can serve as primary care doctors, mostly to people in their 70s, 80s and older who have multiple medical conditions. They also provide consultations and work in interdisciplinary medical teams caring for older patients.

Recognizing that training programs can’t meet expected demand as the population ages, the specialty has launched programs to educate other physicians in the principles of geriatric medicine.

“We’ve been trying to get all clinicians trained in what we call the ‘101 level’ of geriatrics,” said Dr. Rosanne Leipzig, a professor of geriatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

Essential competencies. Researchers have spent considerable time over the past several years examining what, exactly, geriatricians do.

A 2014 article by Leipzig and multiple co-authors defined 12 essential competencies, including optimizing older adults’ functioning and well-being; helping seniors and their families clarify their goals for care and shaping care plans accordingly; comprehensive medication management; extensive care coordination; and providing palliative and end-of-life care, among others skills.

Underlying these skills is an expert understanding how older adults’ bodies, minds and lives differ from middle-age adults.

“We take a much broader history that looks at what our patients can and can’t do, how they’re getting along in their environment, how they see their future, their support systems, and their integration in the community,” said Dr. Kathryn Eubank, medical director of the Acute Care for Elders unit at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. “And when a problem arises with a patient, we tend to ask ‘How do we put this in the context of other concerns that might be contributing?’ ”

Geriatric syndromes. Another essential competency is a focus on issues that other primary care doctors often neglect — notably falls, incontinence, muscle weakness, frailty, fatigue, cognitive impairment and delirium. In medicine, these are known as “geriatric syndromes.”

“If you’re losing weight, you’re falling, you can’t climb a flight of stairs, you’re tired all the time, you’re unhappy and you’re on 10 or more medications, go see a geriatrician,” said Dr. John Morley, professor of geriatrics at Saint Louis University.

“Much of what we do is get rid of treatments prescribed by other physicians that aren’t working,” Morley continued.

Recently, he wrote of an 88-year-old patient with metastasized prostate cancer who was on 26 medications. The older man was troubled by profound fatigue, which dissipated after Morley took him off all but one medication. (Most of the drugs had minimal expected benefit for someone at the end of life.) The patient died peacefully eight months later.

Eubank tells of an 80-year-old combative and confused patient whom her team saw in the hospital after one of his legs had been amputated. Although physicians recognized the patient was delirious, they had prescribed medications that worsened that condition, given him insufficient pain relief and overlooked his constipation.

“Medications contributing to the patient’s delirium were stopped. We made his room quieter so he was disturbed less and stopped staff from interrupting his sleep between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m.,” Eubank said. “We worked to get him up out of bed, normalized his life as much as possible and made sure he got a pocket talker [hearing device] so he could hear what was going on.”

Over the next four days, the patient improved every day and was successfully discharged to rehabilitation.

Finding help. A geriatric consultation typically involves two appointments: one to conduct a comprehensive assessment of your physical, psychological, cognitive and social functioning, and another to go over a proposed plan of care.

The American Geriatrics Society has a geriatrician-finder on its website — a useful resource. Also, you can check whether a nearby medical school or academic medical center has a department of geriatrics.

Many doctors claim competency in caring for older adults. Be concerned if they fail to go over your medications carefully, if they don’t ask about geriatric syndromes or if they don’t inquire about the goals you have for your care, advised Dr. Mindy Fain, chief of geriatrics and co-director of the Arizona Center on Aging at the University of Arizona.

Also, don’t hesitate to ask pointed questions: Has this doctor had any additional training in geriatric care? Does she approach the care of older adults differently — if so, how? Are there certain medications she doesn’t use?

“You’ll be able to see in the physician’s mannerisms and response if she takes you seriously,” Leipzig said.

If not, keep looking for one who does.

KHN’s coverage related to aging & improving care of older adults is supported by The John A. Hartford Foundation.

We’re eager to hear from readers about questions you’d like answered, problems you’ve been having with your care and advice you need in dealing with the health care system. Visit khn.org/columnists to submit your requests or tips.

For more information on Kaiser Health News, please visit our web page at: http://khn.org

  • Kaiser Health News
    1330 G St. NW
    Washington, DC 20005
    (202) 347-5270
Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Washington, DC

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Too loud for too long: Loud noises damage hearing Vital Signs February 2017

seniorhelpdesk.com healthcare  videeo blog credited to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC 

Too Loud! For Too Long! 

Loud noises damage hearing

 

Overview

Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition in the US. Almost twice as many people report hearing loss as report diabetes or cancer. Noise exposure away from your job can damage your hearing just as much as working in a noisy place. Being around too much loud noise—like using a leaf blower or going to loud concerts—can cause permanent hearing loss. And once it’s gone, you can’t get it back! You can have hearing loss before you even notice you’re having problems. Noise is measured in what are called decibels (dB). Over time, listening to loud sounds at high dB levels can cause hearing loss—or other hearing problems like a ringing sound in your ear that won’t go away. The louder a sound is, and the longer you are exposed to it, the more likely it will damage your hearing. The more often you are exposed to loud sounds over time, the more damage occurs. It’s important for healthcare providers to ask about hearing and to screen those who are at risk.

Healthcare providers can:

  • Ask patients about exposure to loud noise and trouble hearing, and examine hearing as part of routine care.
  • Provide hearing tests when patients show or report hearing problems, or refer them to a hearing specialist.
  • Explain how noise exposure can permanently damage hearing.
  • Counsel patients on how to protect hearing.

 

	Man mowing the lawn

About 40 million US adults aged 20-69 years have noise-induced hearing loss.

More than 1 in 2 US adults with hearing damage from noise do not have noisy jobs.

About 1 in 4 US adults who report excellent to good hearing already have hearing damage.

 

Problem

Many people are exposed to noise that damages their hearing.

Hearing gets worse over time the more often people are exposed to loud sounds.

  • About 53% of people ages 20-69 who have hearing damage from noise report no on-the-job exposure.
  • About 24% of people ages 20-69 who report having excellent hearing have measurable hearing damage.
  • About 20% of adults with no job exposure to loud sounds have hearing damage.

Hearing loss often gets worse for years before anyone notices or diagnoses it.

  • People may not know that activities away from work can damage hearing just as much as noise on the job.
  • People delay reporting hearing loss because they don’t know or won’t admit they have a problem.
  • Less than half (46%) of adults who reported trouble hearing had seen a healthcare provider for their hearing in the past 5 years.

Hearing loss causes many problems.

  • Continual exposure to noise can cause stress, anxiety, depression, high blood pressure, heart disease, and many other health problems.
  • Some people are at higher risk for hearing loss, including those who: 
    • are exposed to loud sounds at home and in the community.
    • work in noisy environments (especially noise of 85 dB or more for 8 hours or longer).
    • take medicines that increase their risk.
    • are male.
    • are age 40 or older.
  •  

    What Can Be Done?

    The Federal government is:

  • Monitoring the health of the nation and setting targets for improvement through the Healthy People 2020 hearing objectives. 
    • Raising public awareness about the health effects of noise-induced hearing loss and how to prevent it.
    • Tracking hearing loss and establishing standards to protect hearing in places such as mines, factories, and airports.
  • Providing information to healthcare providers about effective counseling on the effects of noise exposure and correct use of hearing protection.
  • Supporting research on the extent of hearing loss in America, contributing factors, and the most effective prevention strategies.
  • Healthcare providers can
  • Ask patients about exposure to loud noise and trouble hearing, and examine hearing as part of routine care.
  • Provide hearing tests when patients show or report hearing problems, or refer them to a hearing specialist.
  • Explain how noise exposure can permanently damage hearing.
  • Counsel patients on how to protect hearing.
  • Everyone can
  • Avoid noisy places whenever possible.
  • Use earplugs, protective ear muffs, noise canceling headphones when near loud noises.
  • Keep the volume down when watching TV, listening to music, and using earbuds or headphones.
  • Ask your doctor for a hearing checkup and how to protect your hearing from noise.
  • Questions healthcare providers can ask patients.
  • Do you find it difficult to follow a conversation if there is background noise?
  • Can you usually hear and understand what someone says in a normal tone of voice when you can’t see that person’s face?
  • Do you feel frustrated with your hearing when talking to family or friends?
  • Are you often exposed to loud sounds, either at work or away from work?
  •  People with hearing loss

     How hearing loss occurs.

     

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People 
    For more information from the CDC / Link:  http://www.cdc.gov
  •  

     

Categories: 
City: 
Shelton
States: 
Connecticut
County: 
New Haven