Advocacy Groups

April 16, is National Healthcare Decisions Day: Make Your Advance Healthcare Decisions and Let Your Wishes Be Known!

April 16, is National Healthcare Decisions Day: Make Your Advance Healthcare decisions and Let Your Wishes Be Known!

National Healthcare Decisions Day educates and empowers the public and healthcare providers to take part in important advance care planning.

Emphasizing the spotlight on the importance of advance directives, National Healthcare Decisions Day, is a collaborative effort of national, state and community organizations. Together these entities work to ensure that the information, opportunity and access needed to document health care decisions is available to all decision-making capable adult citizens of United States.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Plan ahead for important healthcare decisions. Use #HealthcareDecisionsDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

National Healthcare Decisions Day was founded by Nathan Kottkamp, McGuireWoods LLP.  For complete information regarding National Healthcare Decisions Day, go to:  http://www.nhdd.org/

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Milford
States: 
Connecticut

Shoreline Area Senior Network, SASN April 2018 meeting on Wednesday April 25, 2018 from 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM. Location/Host: Cedar Woods Senior Living 80 Cedar Street Branford, CT 06405

Shoreline Area Senior Network, SASN April 2018 meeting on Wednesday April 25, 2018 from 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM. Location/Host: Cedar Woods Senior Living
80 Cedar Street Branford, CT  06405 

You must RSVP so we can be sure to have enough breakfast items and seating.  Please respond by clicking the RSVP link below by no later than Monday, April 23, 2018.

RSVP Link:  SASN-RSVP@comcast.net

HOST/LOCATION:

  

Cedar Woods Senior Living
80 Cedar Street
Branford, CT  06405 

 203-528-0289

 

SPONSORS: 
 

  

 

 

    

SPEAKER

   Debra A. Hamilton, Esq./Mediator  

  Hamilton Law and Mediation PLLC 

                                                  
TOPIC 

    "MAAPing the Journey Pets Take When No One Can Care For Them"

This program gives a simple outline that can be used by practitioners to assist seniors in planning for the long/short term care of their beloved animal companions. 

 

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Branford
States: 
Connecticut
start time: 
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - 8:00am

2018 LeadingAge Connecticut Annual Expo on May 8, 2018 from 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM. Location: Aqua Turf Club 556 Mulberry Street Plantsville, CT

 

 

2018 LeadingAge Connecticut Annual EXPO on May 8, 2018 from 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM. Location: Aqua Turf Club  556 Mulberry Street  Plantsville, CT 

Please join us for our annual tradeshow and educational event that is specifically designed for management level professionals. With an average attendance of over 300 providers of aging services and senior housing, it's an excellent opportunity for networking.  Attendee information: http://www.leadingagect.org/expo-attendee

LeadingAge Connecticut's  2018 EXPO is one of the largest trade shows in Connecticut for aging services vendors. This year’s EXPO will feature over eighty local and nationall companies with many products and services to showcase. These vendors represent a large variety of services including: accounting, architecture, banking, building services, construction, food service, group purchasing, human resources, health care, insurance, linen, medical supplies, patient handling, pharmacy, rehabilitation on, transportation on and wound care. Pack your business cards and don’t miss this great opportunity to learn about what’s new in our field! 

The LeadingAge Connecticut EXPO is the opportunity to reconnect and network with your peers in the aging services conitnuum. Join the EXPO Grand Sponsors and our Platnum and Gold Partners at a networking breakfast and luncheon and make some new contacts. 

For more information on The LeadingAge Connecticut visit:   www.leadingagect.org

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Plantsville
States: 
Connecticut

2018 The Alzheimer's Association Connecticut Chapter's 21st Annual Dementia Education Conference On Thursday, April 19, 2018 at the Mohegan Sun Convention Center in Uncasville, CT​

 

2018 ~ The Alzheimer's Association Connecticut Chapter's  21st Annual Dementia Education Conference On Thursday, April 19, 2018 at the Mohegan Sun Convention Center in Uncasville, CT

Conference time: 8:30

For more information visit: https://www.alz.org/ct/

2018 Keynote Speaker: KENNETH J. DOKA, PhD

Dr. Kenneth J. Doka is a Professor of Gerontology at the Graduate School of The College of New Rochelle and Senior Consultant to the Hospice Foundation of America. A prolific author, Dr. Doka’s books include When Grief Is Complicated, Grief Is a Journey: Finding your Pathway through Loss, Managing Conflict, Finding Meaning, The Longest Loss: Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia, Helping Adolescents Cope with Loss, Journeys with Grief: A Collection of Articles about Love, Life, and Loss, Improving Care for Veterans Facing Illness and Death, Ethics and End-of-Life Care, Beyond Kübler-Ross: New Perspectives on Death, Dying, and Grief, Spirituality and End-of-Life Care, Grieving beyond Gender: Understanding the Ways Men and Woman Mourn; Counseling Individuals with Life-Threatening Illness; Cancer and End-of-Life Care; Diversity and End-of-Life Care; Living with Grief: Children and Adolescents, Living with Grief: Before and After Death, Death, Dying and Bereavement: Major Themes in Health and Social Welfare (a 4 Volume edited work), Pain Management at the End-of-Life: Bridging the Gap between Knowledge and Practice, Living with Grief: Ethical Dilemmas at the End of Life, Living with Grief: Alzheimer’s Disease, Living with Grief: Coping with Public Tragedy; Men Don’t Cry, Women Do: Transcending Gender Stereotypes of Grief; Living with Grief: Loss in Later Life, Disenfranchised Grief: Recognizing Hidden Sorrow: Living with Life Threatening Illness; Children Mourning, Mourning Children; Death and Spirituality; Living with Grief: After Sudden Loss; Living with Grief: When Illness is Prolonged; Living with Grief: Who We Are, How We Grieve; Living with Grief: At Work, School and Worship; Living with Grief: Children, Adolescents and Loss; Caregiving and Loss: Family Needs, Professional Responses; AIDS, Fear and Society; Aging and Developmental Disabilities; and Disenfranchised Grief: New Directions, Challenges, and Strategies for Practice. In addition to these books, he has published over 100 articles and book chapters. Dr. Doka is editor of both Omega: The Journal of Death and Dying and Journeys: A Newsletter to Help in Bereavement. He has an ongoing blog for Psychology Today entitled Good Mourning.

Dr. Doka was elected President of the Association for Death Education and Counseling in 1993. In 1995, he was elected to the Board of Directors of the International Work Group on Dying, Death and Bereavement and served as chair from 1997-1999. The Association for Death Education and Counseling presented him with an Award for Outstanding Contributions in the Field of Death Education in 1998 and Significant Contributions to the Field of Thanatology in 2014. In 2000 Scott and White presented him an award for Outstanding Contributions to Thanatology and Hospice. His Alma Mater Concordia College presented him with their first Distinguished Alumnus Award. He is a recipient of the Caring Hands Award as well as the Dr. Robert Fulton CDEB Founder’s Award. In 2006, Dr. Doka was grandfathered in as a Mental Health Counselor under NY State’s first licensure of counselors.

Dr. Doka has keynoted conferences throughout North America as well as Europe, Asia, Australia and New Zealand. He participates in the annual Hospice Foundation of America Teleconference and has appeared on CNN and Nightline. In addition he has served as a consultant to medical, nursing, funeral service and hospice organizations as well as businesses and educational and social service agencies. Dr. Doka is an ordained Lutheran minister.

Web Page: http://www.drkendoka.com/ 

About The Alzheimer's Association Connecticut Chapter:

Alzheimer’s disease affects more than 72,000 people in Connecticut. The Alzheimer‘s Association provides services to those affected by Alzheimer’s and other dementias; advocates for policy change and research funding; and advances research toward prevention, treatment and a cure. The Alzheimer’s Association Connecticut Chapter’s main office is in Southington, with regional offices throughout the state in Hamden, New Milford, Norwich, and Norwalk. To learn more, contact the Connecticut Chapter at 860-828-2828 or visit our website alz.org/CT.

Toll-free Helpline: A 24/7 Helpline service provides people with memory loss, caregivers, healthcare professionals and the public information, referrals, and emotional support: 1-800-272-3900

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Uncasville
States: 
Connecticut

Is There Such A Thing As Normal Aging?

Seniorhelpdesk.com Healthcare Blog Credited to Bruce Horovitz and Kaiser Health News 

 Cover photo: Caroline Mayer, with her husband, Ed, visits the Cape Cod Canal earlier this year. (Courtesy of Caroline Mayer)

This story also ran on USA Today. This story can be republished for free. Details link: http://khn.org/syndication/

For 93-year-old Joseph Brown, the clearest sign of aging was his inability the other day to remember he had to have his pants unzipped to pull them on.

For 95-year-old Caroline Mayer, it was deciding at age 80 to put away her skis, after two hip replacements.

And for 56-year-old Dr. Thomas Gill, a geriatric professor at Yale University, it’s accepting that his daily 5½-mile jog now takes him upward of 50 minutes — never mind that he long prided himself on running the distance in well under that time.

Is there such a thing as normal aging?

The physiological changes that occur with aging are not abrupt, said Gill.

Caroline and Ed Mayer are pictured traveling in West Virginia in 1950. (Courtesy of Caroline Mayer)

The changes happen across a continuum as the reserve capacity in almost every organ system declines, he said. “Think of it, crudely, as a fuel tank in a car,” said Gill. “As you age, that reserve of fuel is diminished.”

Drawing on their decades of practice along with the latest medical data, Gill and three geriatric experts agreed to help identify examples of what are often — but not always – considered to be signposts of normal aging for folks who practice good health habits and get recommended preventive care.

The 50s: Stamina Declines

Gill recognizes that he hit his peak as a runner in his 30s and that his muscle mass peaked somewhere in his 20s. Since then, he said, his cardiovascular function and endurance have slowly decreased. He’s the first to admit that his loss of stamina has accelerated in his 50s. He is reminded, for example, each time he runs up a flight of stairs.

In your 50s, it starts to take a bit longer to bounce back from injuries or illnesses, said Stephen Kritchevsky, 57, an epidemiologist and co-director of the J. Paul Sticht Center for Healthy Aging and Alzheimer’s Prevention at Wake Forest University. While our muscles have strong regenerative capacity, many of our organs and tissues can only decline, he said.

Dr. David Reuben, 65, experienced altitude sickness and jet lag for the first time in his 50s. To reduce those effects, Reuben, director of the Multicampus Program in Geriatrics Medicine and Gerontology and chief of the geriatrics division at UCLA, learned to stick to a regimen — even when he travels cross-country: He tries to go to bed and wake up at the same time, no matter what time zone he’s in.

There often can be a slight cognitive slowdown in your 50s, too, said Kritchevsky. As a specialist in a profession that demands mental acuity, he said, “I feel I can’t spin quite as many plates at the same time as I used to.” That, he said, is because cognitive processing speeds typically slow with age.

The 60s: Susceptibility Increases 

There’s a good reason why even healthy folks age 65 and up are strongly encouraged to get vaccines for flu, pneumonia and shingles: Humans’ susceptibility and negative response to these diseases increase with age. Those vaccines are critical as we get older, Gill said, since these illnesses can be fatal — even for healthy seniors.

Hearing loss is common, said Kritchevsky, especially for men.

Reaching age 60 can be emotionally trying for some, as it was for Reuben, who recalls 60 “was a very tough birthday for me. Reflection and self-doubt is pretty common in your 60s,” he said. “You realize that you are too old to be hired for certain jobs.”

The odds of suffering some form of dementia doubles every five years beginning at age 65, said Gill, citing an American Journal of Public Health report. While it’s hardly dementia, he said, people in their 60s might begin to recognize a slowing of information retrieval. “This doesn’t mean you have an underlying disease,” he said. “Retrieving information slows down with age.”

The 70s: Chronic Conditions Fester

Many folks in their mid-70s function as folks did in their mid-60s just a generation ago, said Gill. But this is the age when chronic conditions — like hypertension or diabetes or even dementia — often take hold. “A small percentage of people will enter their 70s without a chronic condition or without having some experiences with serious illness,” he said.

People in their 70s are losing bone and muscle mass, which makes them more susceptible to sustaining a serious injury or fracture in the event of a fall, Gill added.

Seventies is the pivotal decade for physical functioning, said Kritchevsky. Toward the end of their 70s, many people start to lose height, strength and weight. Some people report problems with mobility, he said, as they develop issues in their hips, knees or feet.

At the same time, roughly half of men age 75 and older experience some sort of hearing impairment, compared with about 40 percent of women, said Kritchevsky, referring to a 2016 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Another conundrum common to the 70s: People tend to take an increasing number of medications used for “preventive” reasons. But these medications are likely to have side effects on their own or in combination, not all of which are predictable, said Gill. “Our kidneys and liver may not tolerate the meds as well as we did earlier in life,” he said.

Perhaps the biggest emotional impact of reaching age 70 is figuring out what to do with your time. Most people have retired by age 70, said Reuben, “and the biggest challenge is to make your life as meaningful as it was when you were working.”

The 80s: Fear Of Falling Grows

Fear of falling — and the emotional and physical blowback from a fall — are part of turning 80.

If you are in your 80s and living at home, the chance that you might fall in a given year grows more likely, said Kritchevsky. About 40 percent of folks 65 and up who are living at home will fall at least once each year, and about 1 in 40 of them will be hospitalized, he said, citing a study from the UCLA School of Medicine and Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center. The study notes that the risk increases with age, making people in their 80s even more vulnerable.

By age 80, folks are more likely to spend time in the hospital — often due to elective procedures such as hip or knee replacements, said Gill, basing this on his own observation as a geriatric specialist. Because of diminished reserve capacities, it’s also tougher to recover from surgery or illnesses in your 80s, he said.

The 90s & Up: Relying On Others 

By age 90, people have roughly a 1-in-3 chance of exhibiting signs of dementia caused by Alzheimer’s disease, said Gill, citing a Rush Institute for Healthy Aging study. The best strategy to fight dementia isn’t mental activity but at least 150 minutes per week of “moderate” physical activity, he said. It can be as simple as brisk walking.

At the same time, most older people — even into their 90s and beyond — seem to be more satisfied with their lives than are younger people, said Kritchevsky.

At 93, Joseph Brown understands this — despite the many challenges he faces daily. “I just feel I’m blessed to be living longer than the average Joe,” he said.

Brown lives with his 81-year-old companion, Marva Grate, in the same single-family home that Brown has owned for 50 years in Hamden, Conn. The toughest thing about being in his 90s, he said, is the time and thought often required to do even the simplest things. “It’s frustrating at times to find that you can’t do the things you used to do very easily,” he said. “Then, you start to question your mind and wonder if it’s operating the way it should.”

Brown, a former maintenance worker who turns 94 in May, said he gets tired — and out of breath — very quickly from physical activity.

He spends ample time working on puzzle books, reading and sitting on the deck, enjoying the trees and flowers. Brown said no one can really tell anyone else what “normal” aging is.

Nor does he claim to know himself. “We all age differently,” he said.

Brown said he doesn’t worry about it, though. “Before the Man Upstairs decides to call me, I plan to disconnect the phone.”

KHN’s coverage of these topics is supported by John A. Hartford Foundation and Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Author: Bruce Horovitz: brucehorovitz@gmail.com

KHN’s coverage related to aging and improving care of older adults is supported in part by The John A. Hartford Foundation.

 Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit health newsroom whose stories appear in news outlets nationwide, is an editorially independent part of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

To contact our columnists with a question or comment use following link: http://khn.org/columnists/For more KHN coverage of aging, and for more information on Kaiser Health News, please visit our web page at: http://khn.org This story can be republished for free.  Details link: http://khn.org/syndication/

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Los Angles
States: 
California

New Haven Area Senior Network, NHASN April 2018 Meeting on Wednesday April 18, 2018 starting at 8:00 am. Location/Host: Arden House Health & Rehab 850 Mix Avenue Hamden, CT

New Haven Area Senior Network, NHASN  April 2018 Meeting on Wednesday April 18, 2018 starting at 8:00 am. Location/Host: Arden House Health & Rehab 850 Mix Avenue Hamden, CT

Host:

Arden House Health & Rehab

850 Mix Ave.

Hamden CT.

Co-host:

VNA Community Healthcare & Hospice

 

Speaker: 

Dr. Alan P. Siegal of Geriatric & Adult Psychiatry (GAP) of Hamden

Topic:

"New Research and Updates in 

Alzheimer's Disease"

Dr. Alan Siegal has been practicing at Geriatric and Adult Psychiatry LLC in Hamden, Connecticut since 1991. He is the current Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine and was the founding director of The Alzheimer's and Cognitive Disorders Research Unit at Yale. 

He is a nationally recognized speaker and healthcare consultant.

 

Please RSVP to:  Kimv@cthomecare.com 

so we can get a count for seating and breakfast

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Hamden
States: 
Connecticut
County: 
New Haven
start time: 
Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - 8:00am

FDA Moves To Cut Nicotine In Cigarettes, Helping Smokers Kick Habit

Seniorhelpdesk.com Healthcare Blog by Liz Szabo and Kaiser Health News 

Cigarettes would contain less addictive nicotine — making them less attractive to smokers — under an “unprecedented” plan the Food and Drug Administration announced Thursday.

Stripping cigarettes of all or most of their addictive power could lead 5 million adults to quit smoking within a year of the plan going into place and another 8 million to quit within five years, according to an analysis published Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine.

By 2100, the plan would prevent 33 million people who are now children or young adults from ever taking up tobacco, saving 8 million lives.

The idea of reducing nicotine to non-addictive or “minimally addictive” levels is the “cornerstone” of a comprehensive tobacco control plan announced in July by FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb.

“We’re taking a pivotal step today that could ultimately bring us closer to our vision of a world where combustible cigarettes would no longer create or sustain addiction — making it harder for future generations to become addicted in the first place and allowing more currently addicted smokers to quit or switch to potentially less harmful products,” Gottlieb said.

Tobacco companies have carefully engineered their products to be as addictive as possible, said Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products. Combustible cigarettes are both the deadliest and the most efficient way to deliver nicotine, he said.

“Today’s advance notice is a request for information, not a proposed rule, and is the first step in a multiyear process,” said Murray Garnick, executive vice president and general counsel of Altria Group, the parent company of Philip Morris USA. “FDA is seeking information about the scope of a nicotine standard, a threshold nicotine level, the nature of implementation, analytical testing methods, technical achievability, and the possible creation of an illicit market. … We plan to participate in every step of this process.”

“We look forward to working with FDA on its science-based review of nicotine levels in cigarettes and to build on the opportunity of establishing a regulatory framework that is based on tobacco harm reduction and recognizes the continuum of risk,” said Dr. James Figlar, executive vice president of research and development for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.

Anti-tobacco activists called the move “extraordinary.”

Matthew Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, urged the FDA to move quickly and set a hard deadline for lowering nicotine levels not just in cigarettes, but in cigars and all combustible tobacco products. Tobacco kills more than 480,000 Americans a year. Smoking also costs the country $300 billion a year in direct health care and lost productivity, Gottlieb said.

“There is no other single action our country can take that would prevent more young people from smoking or save more lives,” Myers said. “This is truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to greatly accelerate progress in reducing tobacco use — the nation’s No. 1 cause of preventable death — and bring us closer to eliminating the death and disease it causes.”

Congress gave the FDA the power to regulate — but not ban — tobacco in 2009.

Smoking rates have declined from nearly 21 percent in 2005 to 15.5 percent in 2016, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The decline has been attributed partly to higher tobacco taxes and smoke-free laws that make it harder for people to find places to light up.

The FDA is accepting public comments on the proposal.

Myers urged the FDA to take additional aggressive actions, such as requiring large graphic health warnings that cover at least half of cigarette packs. He said the FDA should also ban menthol cigarettes and other flavored tobacco products, which are often more attractive to children because they mask the harsh taste.

The FDA is considering a number of key questions about implementing the proposal. Those include: What potential maximum nicotine level would be appropriate? Should a new standard be implemented all at once or gradually? Would limits on nicotine foster the growth of a black market in high-nicotine cigarettes? Would smokers compensate for the loss of nicotine by smoking more cigarettes?

The FDA will make two additional announcements about proposed tobacco rules, including ones related to flavors in cigarettes and another on so-called premium cigars.

Given that the tobacco industry is likely to fight these proposals, it could be eight to 10 years before reduced-nicotine cigarettes become a reality, said Erika Sward, assistant vice president of national advocacy for the American Lung Association.

The speed with which the FDA acts depends heavily on “the political will of the administration,” Sward said.

Author: Liz Szabo: lszabo@kff.org, @LizSzabo Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit health newsroom whose stories appear in news outlets nationwide, is an editorially independent part of the Kaiser Family Foundation.To contact our columnists with a question or comment use following link: http://khn.org/columnists/

Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit health newsroom whose stories appear in news outlets nationwide, is an editorially independent part of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

To contact our columnists with a question or comment use following link: http://khn.org/columnists/

For more KHN coverage of aging, and for more information on Kaiser Health News, please visit our web page at: http://khn.org

 This story can be republished for free.  Details link: http://khn.org/syndication/

 

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Dallas
States: 
Texas

Adapting Activities for People with Alzheimer's Disease

Adapting Activities for People with Alzheimer's Disease

Senior Help Desk helthcare blog credited to The National Institute on Aging, part of NIH   

Doing things we enjoy gives us pleasure and adds meaning to our lives. People with Alzheimer's disease need to be active and do things they enjoy. However, don't expect too much. It's not easy for them to plan their days and do different tasks.

People with Alzheimer's may have trouble deciding what to do each day, which could make them fearful and worried or quiet and withdrawn, or they may have trouble starting tasks. Remember, the person is not being lazy. He or she might need help organizing the day or doing an activity.

Activity Planning

Plan activities that the person with Alzheimer's enjoys in your daily routine, and try to do them at a similar time each day. He or she can be a part of the activity or just watch. Here are things you can do to help the person enjoy the activity:

  • Match the activity with what the person with Alzheimer's can do.
  • Choose activities that can be fun for everyone.
  • Help the person get started.
  • Decide if he or she can do the activity alone or needs help.
  • Watch to see if the person gets frustrated.
  • Make sure he or she feels successful and has fun.
  • Let him or her watch if that is more enjoyable.

Try These Activities

The person with Alzheimer's disease can do different activities each day. This keeps the day interesting and fun. Here are some daily activities people with Alzheimer's may enjoy:

  • Household chores: Wash dishes, set the table, prepare food, sweep the floor, dust, sort mail and clip coupons, sort socks and fold laundry, sort recycling materials or other things.
  • Cooking and baking: Decide what is needed to prepare the dish; measure, mix, and pour; tell someone else how to prepare a recipe; watch others prepare food.
  • Exercise: Take a walk together, watch exercise videos or TV programs made for older people, use a stationary bike, use stretching bands, throw a soft ball or balloon back and forth, lift weights or household items such as soup cans.
  • Music and dancing: Play music, talk about the music and the singer, ask what the person with Alzheimer's was doing when the song was popular, sing or dance to well-known songs, attend a concert or musical program.
  • Pets: Feed, groom, walk, sit and hold a pet.
  • Gardening: Take care of indoor or outdoor plants, plant flowers and vegetables, water the plants when needed, go to school events, talk about how much the plants are growing.
  • Visiting with children: Play a simple board game, read stories or books, visit family members who have small children, walk in the park or around schoolyards, go to school events, talk about fond memories from childhood.

Going Out

People in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease may still enjoy going out to places they enjoyed in the past. For example, the person might enjoy going to a favorite restaurant, park, shopping mall, swimming pool, museum, or theater. Keep going on these outings as long as you are comfortable with them.

Plan Ahead for Outings

Here are some tips to make outings fun:

  • Plan outings for the time of day when the person with Alzheimer's is at his or her best.
  • Keep outings from becoming too long. Take note of how tired the person gets after a certain amount of time. Bring the person home before he or she becomes overtired.
  • Use a business-size card to tell others about the person's disease. Sharing this information with store clerks or restaurant staff can make outings more comfortable for everyone. For example, the card could say "My family member has Alzheimer's disease. He might say or do things that are unexpected. Thank you for your understanding."

Eating Out

Going out to eat can be a welcome change, but it can also be challenging. Planning can help. Before choosing a restaurant, think about its layout, menu, noise level, waiting times, and the helpfulness of the staff. Ask yourself:

  • Does the person with Alzheimer's disease know the restaurant well?
  • Is it quiet or noisy most of the time?
  • Are tables easy to get to? Do you need to wait before being seated?
  • Is the service quick enough to keep the person from getting restless?
  • Does the restroom meet the person's needs?
  • Are foods the person with Alzheimer's likes on the menu?
  • Is the staff understanding and helpful?

Before going to the restaurant, decide if it is a good day to go. If it is, think about the best time to go. Earlier in the day may be best, so the person with Alzheimer's is not too tired. Also, the restaurant may be less crowded, and service may be quicker. If you decide to go later, try to get the person to take a nap first.

Before you leave home, gather what you need. Helpful items may include utensils, a towel, wipes, or bathroom items.

At the Restaurant

  • Tell the waiter or waitress about any special needs, such as extra spoons, bowls, or napkins.
  • Ask for a table near the restroom and in a quiet area. Seat the person with his or her back to busy areas.
  • Help the person choose a meal, if needed. Suggest food you know the person likes. Read parts of the menu or show the person pictures of the food. Limit the number of choices.
  • Ask the server to fill glasses half full or leave the drinks for you to serve.
  • Order finger food or snacks to hold the attention of the person with Alzheimer's.
  • Go with the person to the restroom. Go into the stall if the person needs help.

Participating in Spiritual Activities

Like you, the person with Alzheimer's may have spiritual needs. If so, you can help the person stay part of his or her faith community. This can help the person feel connected to others and remember pleasant times. Here are some tips for helping a person with Alzheimer's disease who has spiritual needs:

  • Involve the person in spiritual activities that he or she has known well. These might include worship, religious or other readings, sacred music, prayer, and holiday rituals.
  • Tell people in your faith community that the person has Alzheimer's disease. Encourage them to talk with the person and show him or her that they still care.
  • Play religious or other music that is important to the person. It may bring back old memories. Even if the person with Alzheimer's has a problem finding the right words to speak, he or she still may be able to sing songs or hymns from the past.

Traveling Overnight

Taking a person with Alzheimer's disease on an overnight trip is a challenge. Traveling can make the person more worried and confused, so it's important to think ahead. Here are some tips.

Plan Ahead

  • Talk with the person's doctor about medicines to calm someone who gets upset while traveling.
  • Find someone to help you at the airport, train station, or bus station.
  • Keep important documents with you in a safe place. These include health insurance cards, passports, doctors' names and phone numbers, a list of medicines, and a copy of the person's medical records.
  • Pack items the person enjoys looking at or holding for comfort.
  • Travel with another family member or friend.
  • Take an extra set of clothing in a carry-on bag.

People with memory problems may wander around a place they don't know well. In case someone with Alzheimer's disease gets lost:

  • Make sure the person wears an ID bracelet or something else that tells others who he or she is.
  • Carry a recent photo of the person with you on the trip.

After You Arrive

  • Allow lots of time for each thing you want to do. Don't plan too many activities.
  • Plan rest periods.
  • Follow a routine like the one you use at home. For example, try to have the person eat, rest, and go to bed at the same time he or she does at home.
  • Keep a well-lighted path to the toilet, and leave the bathroom light on at night.
  • Be prepared to cut your visit short if necessary.

Visiting Family and Friends

Spending time with family and friends is important to people with Alzheimer's disease. They may not always remember who people are, but they often enjoy the company. Here are some tips to share with people you plan to visit:

  • Be calm and quiet. Don't use a loud voice or talk to the person with Alzheimer's as if he or she were a child.
  • Respect the person's personal space, and don't get too close.
  • Make eye contact and call the person by name to get his or her attention.
  • Remind the person who you are if he or she doesn't seem to know you. Try not to say, "Don't you remember?"
  • Don't argue if the person is confused. Respond to the feelings that he or she expresses. Try to distract the person by talking about something different.
  • Remember not to take it personally if the person doesn't recognize you, is unkind, or gets angry. He or she is acting out of confusion.
  • Have ready some kind of activity, such as a familiar book or photo album to look at. This can help if the person with Alzheimer's is bored or confused and needs to be distracted. But be prepared to skip the activity if it is not needed.

Read about this topic in Spanish. Lea sobre este tema en español.

For More Information About Adapting Activities for People with Alzheimer's

NIA Alzheimer’s and related Dementias Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center
1-800-438-4380 (toll-free)
adear@nia.nih.gov
www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers
The National Institute on Aging’s ADEAR Center offers information and free print publications about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias for families, caregivers, and health professionals. ADEAR Center staff answer telephone, email, and written requests and make referrals to local and national resources.

Family Caregiver Alliance
1-800-445-8106 (toll-free)
info@caregiver.org
www.caregiver.org

The National Institute on Aging, part of NIH leads the federal government effort conducting and supporting research on aging and the health and well-being of older people. The Institute seeks to understand the nature of aging and the aging process, and diseases and conditions associated with growing older, in order to extend the healthy, active years of life. For more information on research, aging, and health, go to www.nia.nih.gov.

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Boston
States: 
Massachusetts

Greater Bridgeport Elderly Services Council/GBESC April 2018 Meeting on Wednesday April 4, 2018 at 8:30 am. Location/Host: The Watermark at 3030 Park, Address: 3030 Park Ave, Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: (203) 502-7593

Greater Bridgeport Elderly Services Council/GBESC  April 2018 Meeting on Wednesday April 4, 2018 at 8:30 am. Location/Host: The Watermark at 3030 Park, Address: 3030 Park Ave, Bridgeport, CT 06604  Phone: (203) 502-7593

RSVP:  kevin.meise@compassus.com

Host /Location: The Watermark at 3030 Park

The Watermark at 3030 Park is a Continuing Care Retirement Community located on a lush 14-acre campus in Fairfield County with something for every taste and need. In addition to Independent Living offered at Town Center, a new state-of-the-art Health Center features private Assisted Living, Memory Care and Skilled Nursing suites – all designed with the human spirit in mind.

For more information visit: https://3030park.watermarkcommunities.com

Speaker: David W. McAllister

David Formed VA Benefits Assistance 2012 to help fellow service members apply for NON-Service connected pension supplement Aid & Attendance. Using his skills as a Physical therapist he assesses veteran or spouse; range of motion, activities of daily living and balance to determine the functionaleligibility of need for the “assistance of another” to complete at least 2 tasks. In addition to identifying the limitations of the veteran or spouse, He completes a narrative with a collaboration of physician and his documentation. By law, he handles NO federal documentation.
www.vabenefitassistance.org

Co-Host: Executive Care:
  

 

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Bridgeport
States: 
Connecticut
County: 
Fairfield
start time: 
Wednesday, April 4, 2018 - 8:30am

2018 LeadingAge Connecticut Annual EXPO - May 8, 2018 from 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM. Location: Aqua Turf Club 556 Mulberry Street Plantsville, CT

2018 LeadingAge Connecticut Annual EXPO - May 8, 2018 from 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM. Location: Aqua Turf Club  556 Mulberry Street  Plantsville, CT 

Please join us for our annual tradeshow and educational event that is specifically designed for management level professionals. With an average attendance of over 300 providers of aging services and senior housing, it's an excellent opportunity for networking. Register at:  https://canpa.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_mc&view=mc&mcid=72&e...

LeadingAge Connecticut's  2018 EXPO is one of the largest trade shows in Connecticut for aging services vendors. This year’s EXPO will feature over eighty local and nationall companies with many products and services to showcase. These vendors represent a large variety of services including: accounting, architecture, banking, building services, construction, food service, group purchasing, human resources, health care, insurance, linen, medical supplies, patient handling, pharmacy, rehabilitation on, transportation on and wound care. Pack your business cards and don’t miss this great opportunity to learn about what’s new in our field! 

The LeadingAge Connecticut EXPO is the opportunity to reconnect and network with your peers in the aging services conitnuum. Join the EXPO Grand Sponsors and our Platnum and Gold Partners at a networking breakfast and luncheon and make some new contacts. 

For more information on The LeadingAge Connecticut visit:   www.leadingagect.org

Categories: 
Advocacy Groups
City: 
Plantsville
States: 
Connecticut
start time: 
Tuesday, May 8, 2018 - 8:30am